LA Times Crossword 23 Oct 22, Sunday - LAXCrossword.com (2022)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Private eye : TEC

“Tec” is a slang term meaning “private detective” or “private investigator” (PI).

A private eye is a private investigator, a PI, a private “I”.

9 Wild hog : BOAR

The wild boar might be described as a matriarchal beast. Fully-grown males live a solitary life, except during mating season. Fully-grown females live together in groups called sounders, along with their offspring.

21 Universal principle : AXIOM

In the world of mathematics, an axiom is a proposition, one that is taken as basic and self-evident. The term “axiom” extends beyond mathematics with a similar meaning, an established or self-evident truth.

26 Parliamentary official overseeing strollers? : BRITISH PRAM MINISTER (from “British Prime Minister”)

Another word used in Britain and Ireland that’s rarely used over here is “pram”, which in my day was the most common term for what is called a baby carriage in the US. “Pram” is short for “perambulator”.

The Prime Minister (PM) of the UK has powers equivalent to the US President, but with major differences. The office of prime minister exists by convention and not by any constitution. The convention is that the King or Queen of England appoints as PM the person most likely to have the confidence of the House of Commons, and that person is usually the leader of the party with the most seats in the Commons. There is no term limit and the PM serves “at His/Her Majesty’s pleasure”. The first UK PM wasn’t actually called “Prime Minister”, and the person first attributed with the equivalent powers was Sir Robert Walpole, the First Lord of the Treasury in 1721.

30 Poke bowl tuna : AHI

Poke is a Native-Hawaiian dish featuring diced raw fish. “Poke” is a Hawaiian word meaning “to slice”.

31 Wine sediment : LEES

The dregs in wine, the sediment that settles during fermentation (and sometimes in the bottle), are also called “lees”.

39 Côte d’Azur view : MER

The Côte d’Azur is on the Mediterranean coast of France and stretches from Saint-Tropez in the west and to the Italian border in the east. In English, we often refer to the area as “the French Riviera”. It’s a little crowded for me (okay, “expensive”), especially in the summer.

40 Barge : SCOW

A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that’s often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often, a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

44 California’s __ Alto : PALO

The city of Palo Alto, California takes its name from a specific redwood tree called El Palo Alto (Spanish for “the tall stick”) that is located within the bounds of the city. The tree is 110 feet tall and over a thousand years old.

48 Pie __ mode : A LA

In French, “à la mode” simply means “fashionable”. In America, the term has also come to describe a way of serving pie. Pie served à la mode includes a dollop of cream or ice cream, or as I recall from my time living in Upstate New York, with a wedge of cheddar cheese.

51 Blue chip called “Big Blue” : IBM

The origin of the IBM nickname “Big Blue” seems to have been lost in the mists of time. That said, maybe it has something to do with the fact that the IBM logo is blue, and almost every mainframe they produced was painted blue. I remember visiting IBM on business a few times in my career, and back then we were encouraged to wear white shirts and blue suits “to fit in” with our client’s culture.

A blue chip is stock in a company that has a reputation for providing a solid return of investment in good times and in bad. The term “blue chip” comes from poker, as blue poker chips are traditionally those with the highest value.

54 Horned African grazer : RHINO

There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, with the smaller Javan Rhino being the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

56 Trees with caffeine-rich nuts : KOLAS

The nut of the kola tree has a bitter taste, and is loaded with caffeine. Despite the taste, the nut is habitually chewed in some cultures, especially in West Africa where the tree is commonly found in the rainforest. Here in the US we best know the kola nut as a flavoring used in cola drinks.

59 OB or ENT : DOC

Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

62 Putting spots : GREENS

That would be golf.

63 Guy who invented tiny nails? : FATHER OF THE BRAD (from “father of the bride”)

A brad is a slender wire nail with a relatively small head that is typically used to tack pieces of wood together, i.e. to fasten either temporarily or with minimal damage to the wood. Nowadays, brads are commonly applied using a nail gun.

67 Breakfast cereal magnate : CW POST

C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape-Nuts, way back in 1897.

70 “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” Oscar nominee : DAVIS

Actress Viola Davis is probably best known on the small screen for playing the lead in the drama “How to Get Away with Murder”. On the big screen, I’d say that her most famous role is the starring role in the 2011 film “The Help”.

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” is a 2020 biopic based on the 1982 play of the same name by August Wilson. Both play and film tell the story of blues singer Ma Rainey. The movie features Viola Davis as Rainey and Chadwick Boseman as trumpeter Levee Green. Boseman died soon after the film wrapped, making “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” his last appearance on the big screen.

71 Cartoonist Chast : ROZ

Roz Chast had her first cartoon published in “The New Yorker” in 1978, and has had more than 800 published since then.

72 Spot for withdrawals : ATM

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

77 John of the “Harold & Kumar” films : CHO

John Cho is an actor and musician who was born in Seoul, South Korea but has lived in the US since he was a young boy. Cho’s break in movies came in playing Harold Lee in the ”Harold & Kumar” films. He is now making a name for himself playing Mr. Sulu in the latest “Star Trek” movies.

“Harold & Kumar” is a trilogy of comedy films about two potheads played by John Cho (Harold) and Kal Penn (Kumar). Not my cup of tea …

79 Allende novel about a masked hero : ZORRO

“Zorro” is a 2005 novel by Chilean author Isabel Allende. The title character comes from a series of stories and pulp fiction from the early 1900s by American author Johnston McCulley. Allende’s work is presented as a biography of Don Diego de la Vega, and an origin story of his alter ego “El Zorro” (The Fox). I’ve put this one on my reading list …

81 Excellent reason to avoid a career as a milliner? : FEAR OF HATS (from “fear of heights”)

A milliner is someone who makes, designs or sells hats. Back in the 1500s, the term described someone who sold hats made in Milan, Italy, hence the name “milliner”.

83 __ goo gai pan : MOO

Moo goo gai pan is the American version of a traditional Cantonese dish. In Cantonese, “moo goo” means “button mushroom”, “gai” is “chicken” and “pan” is “slices”.

85 Notes before sols : FAS

The sol-fa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

87 Betting tactic : PARLAY

A parlay is a combination wager, one that links two or more bets. All bets have to win in order to collect on a parlay.

89 Kin of -trix : -ENNE

The feminine suffix “-trix” is Latin in origin, and is equivalent to the male suffix “-tor”. Examples of usage would be “aviatrix” and “aviator”. Similarly, the feminine suffix “-ette” came into English from French, with the suffix “-et” being the male equivalent. Examples of usage would be “brunette” and “brunet”. The suffix “-enne_ also came into English from French, with a male equivalent of “-en” and “-an”. Examples would be “comedienne, comedian” and “doyenne, doyen”.

90 Fr. holy women : STES

“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a “femme” (woman).

92 Dad __ : BOD

A “dad bod” is a man’s body that is softly rounded. Well, that’s the description I like to use …

93 Evidence that leads to identity thieves? : HACKING TRAIL (from “hiking trail”)

A computer hacker is a computer expert, and in particular one who uses that expertise to solve problems with hardware and software. So, the original use of the term “hacking” was very positive. Since the 1980s, the term “hacker” is more commonly used for an expert in subverting computer security.

95 Animation collectibles : CELS

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

97 Xperia Tablet maker : SONY

The Xperia is a line of smartphones that Sony has been making since 2008. The company introduced Xperia tablets in 2012. The name “Xperia” is formed from the English word “experience”.

98 Forest female : DOE

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and the females called cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

99 How one kisses a famous rock at Blarney Castle? : NOSE TO THE GRAND STONE (from “nose to the grindstone”)

Blarney is a town in County Cork in the south of Ireland. Blarney is home to Blarney Castle, and inside the castle is the legendary Blarney Stone. “Kissing the Blarney Stone” is a ritual engaged in by many, many tourists (indeed, I’ve done it myself!), but it’s not a simple process. The stone is embedded in the wall of the castle, and in order to kiss it you have to sit on the edge of the parapet and lean way backwards so that your head is some two feet below your body. There is a staff member there to help you and make sure you don’t fall. The Blarney Stone has been referred to as the world’s most unhygienic tourist attraction! But once you’ve kissed it, supposedly you are endowed with the “gift of the gab”, the ability to talk eloquently and perhaps deceptively without offending. The term “blarney” has come to mean flattering and deceptive talk.

To keep one’s nose close to the grindstone is to work conscientiously. The phrase probably comes from the practice of sharpening the blades of knives using a grindstone. A careful knife grinder would lean forward, with the face close to the rotating stone while carefully holding the blade to hone the edge.

109 Suffix with buck : -AROO

The American-English word “buckaroo” (sometimes “buckeroo”) comes from “vaquero”, the Spanish for cowboy.

110 NFL analyst Tony : ROMO

Tony Romo is a former quarterback who spent his entire NFL career with the Dallas Cowboys. Romo is also an avid amateur golfer and has even tried (albeit unsuccessfully) to qualify for the US Open golf championship.

111 Light fabric : LINEN

The textile known as linen is made from flax fibers. The name “linen” probably comes from “linum”, which is Latin for both “flax” and “textile made from flax”.

112 Free-for-all : MELEE

Our term “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means “confused fight”.

113 Dash dial : TACH

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hooves of the horses. Quite interesting …

115 “Miss Congeniality 2: __ and Fabulous” : ARMED

“Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous” is a 2005 sequel to the entertaining comedy film “Miss Congeniality” released in 2000. The title character is played by Sandra Bullock, who had a lot of say about the storyline. She has remarked that her intent was to produce a comedy in which the “girl” is a buddy, and does not have to end up with the “guy”. She did not “Miss Congeniality 2” to be a romantic comedy.

117 Humboldt River city : ELKO

The city of Elko, Nevada came into being in 1868 as a settlement built around the eastern end of a railway line that was constructed from California and that was destined for Utah. When that section of the line was completed, the construction crews moved on towards the Nevada/Utah border, and the settlement was left behind to eventually form the city of Elko

The Humboldt River in northern Nevada never makes it to the ocean. Rather, it empties into the Humboldt Sink, a dry lake located about 50 miles northeast of Reno. Eventually named for German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, the river had many names in the past , including “Unknown River”, “Paul’s River”, “Mary’s River”, “Swampy River”, “Barren River” and “Ogden River”.

119 Watermelon leftovers : SEEDS

The watermelon that we find in the grocery store is actually a berry produced by the flowering, vine-like watermelon plant. Seedless watermelons were developed by Japanese scientists in 1939, and now seedless varieties account for over 80% of watermelon sales in the US.

Down

4 Vegetable in red flannel hash : BEET

Red Flannel Hash is made using beets, potatoes, onions and corned beef. In times past, It was a traditional meal served the day after a corned beef and cabbage dinner, presumably to use up leftover corned beef.

5 Aleppo native : SYRIAN

Aleppo is the largest city in Syria and is located not far from Damascus, the nation’s capital. Aleppo owes its size and history of prosperity to its location at the end of the Silk Road, the trade route that linked Asia to Europe (and other locations). The Suez Canal was opened up in 1869 bringing a new route for transport of goods, and so Aleppo’s prosperity declined over the past one hundred years or so. The city’s population has suffered terribly since the start of the Syrian Civil War, with the Battle of Aleppo raging from 2012 to 2016.

8 Parking lot siren : CAR ALARM

There are two classes of car alarm, namely passive and active. A passive alarm turns on automatically when the vehicle’s doors are locked after the ignition is turned off. There is no need for the driver to set the alarm, hence the term “passive”. An active alarm requires the driver’s intervention for arming.

10 Desert hangout : OASIS

An isolated area of vegetation in a desert is called an oasis (plural “oases”). As water is needed for plant growth, an oasis might also include a spring, pond or small lake. We often use the term “oasis” more generally to describe a haven, a place of rest.

12 Doctors-in-training : RESIDENTS

A resident is a physician who has graduated from medical school, and who is receiving specialized graduate training in a hospital. The concept of residency developed in the late 1800s. Back then, the doctors would often “reside” in hospital-provided housing while receiving the training, hence the term “resident”.

16 Chaney of horror : LON

Lon Chaney, Sr. played a lot of crazed-looking characters in the days of silent movies. He did much of his own make-up work, developing the grotesque appearances that became his trademark, and earning himself the nickname “the man of a thousand faces”. Most famous were his portrayals of the title characters in the films “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1923) and “The Phantom of the Opera” (1925).

17 Sounds in a yoga studio : OMS

“Om” is a sacred mystic word from the Hindu tradition. “Om” is sometimes used as a mantra, a focus for the mind in meditation.

19 Island where Gauguin painted “Vahine no te tiare” : TAHITI

Tahiti is the most populous island in French Polynesia, which is located in the central Southern Pacific. Although Captain Cook landed in Tahiti in 1769, he wasn’t the first European to do so. However, Cook’s visit was the most significant in that it heralded a whole spate of European visitors, who brought with them prostitution, venereal disease and alcohol. Included among the subsequent visitors was the famous HMS Bounty under the charge of Captain Bligh.

Paul Gauguin was a French artist in the Post-Impressionist period. Gauguin was a great friend of Vincent van Gogh, and indeed was staying with him in Arles when van Gogh famously cut off his own ear. Equally famously, Gauguin “fled” to Tahiti in 1891 to escape the conventions of European life. He painted some of his most famous works on the island. After ten years living in Tahiti, Gauguin relocated to the Marquesas Islands, where he passed away in 1903.

“Tahitian Woman with a Flower” is an 1801 painting by Paul Gauguin that can be viewed in the Glyptoteket art museum in Copenhagen. Painted during his years in Tahiti, it goes by the title “Vahine no te tiare” in Tahitian, which translates literally as “Woman with a Flower”. It is believed to be Gauguin’s first portrait of a Tahitian model.

27 Fancy pillow covers : SHAMS

A sham is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens, a sham is also an imitation or fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

29 Figure skater Hughes : SARAH

American figure skater Sarah Hughes won the Ladies Singles’ gold medal at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games.

33 Eyeball benders : OP ART

Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

34 Snack chip : NACHO

The dish known as “nachos” was supposedly created by the maître d’ at a restaurant called the Victory Club in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico. The name of the maître d’ was Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya.

35 California town whose name means “the river” : EL RIO

El Rio is a town in Ventura County, California. It was founded as New Jerusalem in 1875, was renamed to Jerusalem, then Elrio and finally El Rio in 1905.

37 Fit of pique : SNIT

Our term “pique” meaning “fit of ill feeling” is a French word meaning “prick, sting, irritation”.

38 Kate’s husband on “This Is Us” : TOBY

“This Is Us” is a television drama that debuted in 2016. The storyline centers on three siblings and their parents. Two of the siblings are the surviving members of a triplet pregnancy. The parents decide to adopt a child born on the same day as the surviving siblings. The adopting family is white, and the adopted child is black.

42 Jimmy of the Daily Planet : OLSEN

In the “Superman” stories, Jimmy Olsen is a cub photographer who works on the “Daily Planet” newspaper with Clark Kent and Lois Lane.

43 Actress Naomi : WATTS

Actress Naomi Watts was born in the UK and moved to Australia when she was 14 years of age. It was in Australia that Watts got her break in television and movies. Probably her most acclaimed role was in the 2003 film “21 Grams” with Sean Penn and Benicio del Toro. Watts is best friends with fellow Australian actress Nicole Kidman.

46 “Invisible Man” writer Ellison : RALPH

Author Ralph Ellison’s most famous book is “Invisible Man”, which won the National Book Award in 1953. Ellison’s full name is Ralph Waldo Ellison, as he was named for Ralph Waldo Emerson.

47 Mosaic flooring : TERRAZZO

Terrazzo is a flooring material made of small stone chips set hard in a binder.

50 Malted spot : SODA SHOP

Walgreens claims to have introduced the malted milkshake, back in 1922.

52 Coast Guard fleet : BOATS

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

53 Monopoly card : DEED

In the game of Monopoly there are 28 title deeds:

  • 22 streets
  • 4 railroads
  • 2 utilities

55 UCLA or USC : SCH

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) gets more applications from potential students than any other university in the country. UCLA also has more students enrolled than any other university in the state.

The University of Southern California (USC) is a private school in Los Angeles. Apart from its excellent academic record, USC is known for the success of its athletic program. USC Trojans have won more Olympic medals than the students of any other university in the world. The USC marching band is very famous as well, and is known as the “Spirit of Troy”. The band has performed with many celebrities, and is the only college band to have two platinum records.

56 Mideast drink made from fermented milk : KEFIR

Kefir is a fermented milk drink that originated in the Caucasus region of Eurasia.

60 Polo Grounds legend Mel : OTT

I wonder if Mel Ott had any idea that he would turn in crosswords so very often?

The original Polo Grounds in New York City was built in 1876 and as one might expect, it was used to play polo. The property was leased in 1880 by the New York Metropolitans and was converted into a baseball stadium. Over the years, the stadium was replaced, three times in all, but the “Polo Grounds” name was retained.

62 Garden product syllable : GRO

The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company was founded in 1868 by one Orlando Scott, and initially sold seed to the agricultural industry. In the early 1900s, Scotts started to sell to homeowners, and mainly supplied lawn seed. The company merged with the gardening company Miracle-Gro in 1955, and then with TruGreen in 2016.

63 __ Corners : FOUR

The Four Corners region of the US surrounds the meeting point of the four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. The Four Corners is the only point in the US that is shared by four states.

64 Norton of “Fight Club” : EDWARD

Edward Norton is a Hollywood actor who was nominated for Oscars for his performances in 1996’s “Primal Fear” (his debut film) and 1998’s “American History X”. I haven’t seen either movie, but really enjoyed him as the villain in “The Italian Job” (2003) and as the title character in “The Illusionist” (2006).

“Fight Club” is a 1996 novel by Chuck Palahniuk about an insomniac who uses an underground fighting club as psychotherapy for his sleeping disorder. Palahniuk’s novel was adapted into a famous 1999 movie starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton.

69 Moon stage : PHASE

The phases of the moon have been given the following names, in order:

  • New moon
  • Waxing crescent moon
  • First quarter moon
  • Waxing gibbous moon
  • Full moon
  • Waning gibbous moon
  • Third quarter moon
  • Waning crescent moon
  • Dark moon

73 “Lemon Tree” singer Lopez : TRINI

Trini Lopez is a noted singer and guitarist from Dallas, Texas. He is perhaps best known for his international hit “If I Had a Hammer” from 1963, as well as “Lemon Tree” from 1965. Lopez had a bit of an acting career as well, most famously appearing as one of “The Dirty Dozen” in the 1967 hit movie.

The 1965 Trini Lopez hit “Lemon Tree” is a folk song that was written by Will Holt earlier in the sixties. Holt’s song is based on a Brazilian folk song “Meu limão, meu limoeiro”.

When I was just a lad of ten, my father said to me,
“Come here and take a lesson from the lovely lemon tree.”
“Don’t put your faith in love, my boy,” my father said to me,
“I fear you’ll find that love is like the lovely lemon tree.”

74 Drive-up lodging : MOTEL

The term “motel” is a portmanteau of “motor” and “hotel”.

76 Brutus Buckeye’s home : OHIO STATE

Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus was founded back in 1870 as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The athletic teams of OSU are called the Buckeyes, named after the state tree of Ohio. In turn the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch thought to resemble a “buck’s eye”. The school’s athletic mascot was introduced in 1965, and is an anthropomorphic buckeye nut named Brutus Buckeye.

78 Hindu festival of colors : HOLI

Holi is a Hindu festival, celebrated in spring, that is also known as the Festival of Colours.

80 “Back to you,” on a walkie-talkie : OVER

The more formal name for a walkie-talkie is “handheld transceiver”. It is a handheld, two-way radio, and a device first developed for military use during WWII by Motorola (although others developed similar designs soon after). The first walkie-talkie was portable, but large. It was back-mounted and was carried around the battlefield by a radio officer.

82 Aesop work : FABLE

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

83 “I Try” Grammy winner : MACY GRAY

Macy Gray is an R&B singer noted for her raspy voice, and a singing style that resembles that of Billie Holliday.

87 French door piece : PANE

French doors usually come in pairs, and have glass panels throughout the body of the door.

93 Syllables from Santa : HO! HO! HO!

Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

94 Cars at a charging station : TESLAS

Tesla Motors shortened its name to just “Tesla” in early 2017.

96 Cosmetician Lauder : ESTEE

Estée Lauder was a very successful businesswoman, and someone with a great reputation as a salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

99 French Quarter city, informally : NOLA

The city of New Orleans, Louisiana has the nickname “The Big Easy”. This name might come from the early 1900s when musicians found it relatively “easy” to find work there. The city is also known by the acronym NOLA, standing for New Orleans (NO), Louisiana (LA).

The oldest neighborhood in the city of New Orleans is the French Quarter, which is also called the “Vieux Carré (French for “Old Square”). After being founded by the French in 1718 as “La Nouvelle-Orléans”, the city developed around this central square.

102 “Silent All These Years” singer Tori : AMOS

“Silent All These Years” is a 1991 song written and recorded by Tori Amos. The song was used later in a campaign to promote awareness of the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN). Amos was the nonprofit’s first spokesperson.

103 Flag : TIRE

Our verb “to flag” meaning “to tire” was originally used in the sense of something flapping about lazily in the wind. From this it came to mean “to go limp, droop”, and then “to tire”.

104 “Drinks are __” : ON ME

I’ll have a pint of Guinness.

107 “Preacher” network : AMC

“Preacher” is a TV series based on a comic book superhero series of the same name. Doesn’t sound like my cup of tea …

108 Quilting party : BEE

Back in 18th-century America, when neighbors would gather to work for the benefit of one of their group, such a meeting was called a bee. The name “bee” was an allusion to the social nature of the insect. In modern parlance, a further element of entertainment and pleasure has been introduced, for example in a quilting bee, or even a spelling bee.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Chunks of marble : SLABS
6 Private eye : TEC
9 Wild hog : BOAR
13 Word of welcome : HELLO
18 Sly : CAGEY
19 Brand of sport sandals : TEVA
20 Blue area on a map : LAKE
21 Universal principle : AXIOM
22 Broadcaster : AIRER
23 U.S. citizen : AMER
24 “No warranties” : AS IS
25 Speed-reads : SCANS
26 Parliamentary official overseeing strollers? : BRITISH PRAM MINISTER (from “British Prime Minister”)
30 Poke bowl tuna : AHI
31 Wine sediment : LEES
32 Calendar boxes : DAYS
33 Brave showing at the bug zapper? : ONE-GNAT STAND (from “one-night stand”)
39 Côte d’Azur view : MER
40 Barge : SCOW
44 California’s __ Alto : PALO
45 Fake ID flashers : MINORS
46 Charge toward : RUN AT
48 Pie __ mode : A LA
49 Like this answer : ACROSS
51 Blue chip called “Big Blue” : IBM
52 Clean halfheartedly? : BAT THE DUST (from “bite the dust”)
54 Horned African grazer : RHINO
55 Farm enclosure : STY
56 Trees with caffeine-rich nuts : KOLAS
57 Zero out : RESET
58 Besides : TOO
59 OB or ENT : DOC
61 Bounded : LEAPT
62 Putting spots : GREENS
63 Guy who invented tiny nails? : FATHER OF THE BRAD (from “father of the bride”)
67 Breakfast cereal magnate : CW POST
70 “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” Oscar nominee : DAVIS
71 Cartoonist Chast : ROZ
72 Spot for withdrawals : ATM
75 “Yeah, sure” : UH-HUH
76 “For sale by” sign poster : OWNER
77 John of the “Harold & Kumar” films : CHO
79 Allende novel about a masked hero : ZORRO
81 Excellent reason to avoid a career as a milliner? : FEAR OF HATS (from “fear of heights”)
83 __ goo gai pan : MOO
84 “Hurry up!” : MOVE IT!
85 Notes before sols : FAS
86 Mates : PAIRS
87 Betting tactic : PARLAY
89 Kin of -trix : -ENNE
90 Fr. holy women : STES
92 Dad __ : BOD
93 Evidence that leads to identity thieves? : HACKING TRAIL (from “hiking trail”)
95 Animation collectibles : CELS
97 Xperia Tablet maker : SONY
98 Forest female : DOE
99 How one kisses a famous rock at Blarney Castle? : NOSE TO THE GRAND STONE (from “nose to the grindstone”)
107 “Cancel the launch!” : ABORT!
109 Suffix with buck : -AROO
110 NFL analyst Tony : ROMO
111 Light fabric : LINEN
112 Free-for-all : MELEE
113 Dash dial : TACH
114 Profess : AVOW
115 “Miss Congeniality 2: __ and Fabulous” : ARMED
116 Stop : CEASE
117 Humboldt River city : ELKO
118 “That’s correct” : YES
119 Watermelon leftovers : SEEDS

Down

1 Sign of healing : SCAB
2 Dragon’s digs : LAIR
3 Farming prefix : AGRI-
4 Vegetable in red flannel hash : BEET
5 Aleppo native : SYRIAN
6 Fill-in worker : TEMP
7 At any time : EVER
8 Parking lot siren : CAR ALARM
9 Threw under the bus : BLAMED
10 Desert hangout : OASIS
11 Analogous : AKIN
12 Doctors-in-training : RESIDENTS
13 Rash : HASTY
14 Surplus : EXCESS
15 “That’s not true!” : LIAR!
16 Chaney of horror : LON
17 Sounds in a yoga studio : OMS
19 Island where Gauguin painted “Vahine no te tiare” : TAHITI
27 Fancy pillow covers : SHAMS
28 Clothing department : MEN’S
29 Figure skater Hughes : SARAH
33 Eyeball benders : OP ART
34 Snack chip : NACHO
35 California town whose name means “the river” : EL RIO
36 “Continue, please” : GO ON
37 Fit of pique : SNIT
38 Kate’s husband on “This Is Us” : TOBY
39 Change into something new : MUTATE
41 Bring about : CAUSE
42 Jimmy of the Daily Planet : OLSEN
43 Actress Naomi : WATTS
46 “Invisible Man” writer Ellison : RALPH
47 Mosaic flooring : TERRAZZO
50 Malted spot : SODA SHOP
52 Coast Guard fleet : BOATS
53 Monopoly card : DEED
55 UCLA or USC : SCH
56 Mideast drink made from fermented milk : KEFIR
60 Polo Grounds legend Mel : OTT
61 Dotes on : LOVES
62 Garden product syllable : GRO
63 __ Corners : FOUR
64 Norton of “Fight Club” : EDWARD
65 Goes off : RANTS
66 Sis’s playmate : BRO
67 Escape artist’s props : CUFFS
68 Whole __ bread : WHEAT
69 Moon stage : PHASE
72 Concert venue : ARENA
73 “Lemon Tree” singer Lopez : TRINI
74 Drive-up lodging : MOTEL
76 Brutus Buckeye’s home : OHIO STATE
77 Screw cap alternative : CORK
78 Hindu festival of colors : HOLI
80 “Back to you,” on a walkie-talkie : OVER
82 Aesop work : FABLE
83 “I Try” Grammy winner : MACY GRAY
84 Astonished cry : MY GOD!
87 French door piece : PANE
88 “Here comes the next act” : AND NOW
91 Recap numbers : SCORES
93 Syllables from Santa : HO! HO! HO!
94 Cars at a charging station : TESLAS
96 Cosmetician Lauder : ESTEE
97 Inventory : STOCK
99 French Quarter city, informally : NOLA
100 Not written down : ORAL
101 Wander around : ROVE
102 “Silent All These Years” singer Tori : AMOS
103 Flag : TIRE
104 “Drinks are __” : ON ME
105 Call for : NEED
106 Fades to black : ENDS
107 “Preacher” network : AMC
108 Quilting party : BEE

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